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Air Cross, Inc


Artificial Photosynthesis

For Cleaner, Healthier Air.

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Air Cross, Inc


Artificial Photosynthesis

For Cleaner, Healthier Air.

Air Cross Video

 

Our goal at Air Cross is to touch the lives of people all over the world that are exposed to unhealthy levels of air pollution. In fact, "more than a billion people--one-fifth of all humanity-- live in communities that do not meet World Health Organization air quality standards" (Worldwatch Institute 2015). Our technology gives us the capability to help those of all economic statuses that have to deal with air pollution and poor air quality, whether they have access to such commodities as electricity (required for central air conditioning and air purifiers) or not. And while these appliances use a tremendous amount of energy (resulting in greenhouse gases being released into the atmosphere), we believe our innovative solution will allow consumers to decrease their energy usage while cleaning their air, helping our consumers live more sustainable, healthier lifestyles. As a result, we believe our product is a win-win for both families and the planet.

The Problem

The majority of people spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors (United States Environmental Protection Agency 2013). During this time they could be inhaling roughly the same amounts of chemicals and air pollutants found outside (sometimes more and sometimes less depending on a number of factors). So far, the only solutions for cleaner indoor air were air purifiers and central air conditioning. While many air filters are extremely efficient at capturing larger particles like pollen and dust, a general rule of thumb is that the smaller the particle or molecule, the harder it is to capture. For example, gases are much smaller than pieces of dust, perhaps 3 atoms compared to perhaps 3,000,000,000,000 atoms which can be found in a typical piece of dust. As a result, many of these small gases can pass through many types of air filters very easily. In fact, "air cleaners are generally not designed to remove gaseous pollutants" (U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission n.d.). These gases can be safe and non-harmful molecules such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, but can also be very toxic gases like ground-level ozone (the primary ingredient in smog) which has roughly the same size and mass as a carbon dioxide molecule. It also takes an extremely long time for all the gases and chemicals in a room to pass through an air filter since the air filter surface area to volume of a room ratio is extremely small. And by the time a molecule of ground-level ozone might reach an air filter, it might have already reacted with either your lung tissues, or a random surface which could generate random chemical byproducts such as formaldehyde, a carcinogen or cancer-causing molecule (Connecticut Department of Public Health 2007). It is also important to note that the more efficient the air filter (smaller pores or openings in the filter which captures more particles and gases) the more energy that is required to push air through the filter as a result of the pressure drop. This corresponds with more greenhouse gases that are being released into the atmosphere as a result, which contributes to climate change.

Our Solution

To address this problem Air Cross developed ecoHEALTH, a spray that incorporates artificial photosynthesis technology. Our spray both completely destroys ground-level ozone from the air, "most widespread pollutant in the United States," and transforms it into sugar (same product as photosynthesis), which is very safe to both humans and the environment (American Lung Association 2015). When the spray is applied onto a surface it transforms the surface into an invisible air filter for months at a time, allowing everyone to breathe cleaner, healthier air in the comfort of their own homes.

OUR Target markets

Cosmetics & Skin Care

Targeted Drug Delivery

Air Pollution Removing Sprays and Paints

Fragrances

Antioxidants

Disinfectant Surfaces

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Air Cross, Inc


"It may be hard to imagine that pollution could be invisible, but ozone is. The most widespread pollutant in the U.S. is also one of the most dangerous".

 

-American Lung Association

Air Cross, Inc


"It may be hard to imagine that pollution could be invisible, but ozone is. The most widespread pollutant in the U.S. is also one of the most dangerous".

 

-American Lung Association

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Air Cross, Inc


"Scientists project that warmer temperatures from climate change will increase the frequency of days with unhealthy levels of ground-level ozone, a harmful air pollutant, and a component in smog". 

 

-United States Environmental Protection Agency

Air Cross, Inc


"Scientists project that warmer temperatures from climate change will increase the frequency of days with unhealthy levels of ground-level ozone, a harmful air pollutant, and a component in smog". 

 

-United States Environmental Protection Agency

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Air Cross, Inc


"Air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk. Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives".


-World Health Organization

Air Cross, Inc


"Air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk. Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives".


-World Health Organization


References

Air Pollution Now Threatening Health Worldwide. (2015, November). In Worldwatch InstituteRetrieved November 8, 2015, from http://www.worldwatch.org/air-pollution-now-threatening-health-worldwide

American Lung Association. (2015). Ozone Pollution. In State of the Air 2015. Retrieved from http://www.stateoftheair.org/2015/health-risks/health-risks-ozone.html

Connecticut Department of Public Health. (2007, May). Ozone Generators: What You Need to Know. In Department of Public Health Fact Sheet. Retrieved from http://www.ct.gov/dph/lib/dph/environmental_health/eoha/pdf/ozone_generator_fact_sheet.pdf

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. (n.d.). The Inside Story: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality. In Safety Education. Retrieved from http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Safety-Education/Safety-Guides/Home/The-Inside-Story-A-Guide-to-Indoor-Air-Quality/

United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2015, July 21). Climate Impacts on Human Health. In U.S. EPA. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/impacts-adaptation/health.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency. (2013, September 13). Questions About Your Community: Indoor Air. Retrieved from http://www.epa.gov/region1/communities/indoorair.html

World Health Organization. (2014, March 25). 7 Million Premature Deaths Annually Linked to Air Pollution. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2014/air-pollution/en/